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Basics & Theory

NRCan: Improving Energy Efficiency Of Existing Windows
Natural Resources Canada describes how to improve energy efficiency of existing windows in the house, repair operable parts, and add one of the many different types of storm window products. (PDF)

US DOE: Consumer Guide To Storm Windows
US Department of Energy describes types of storm windows and tips for making them more energy efficient.
Issues & Performance

LBNL: Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performed a field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows in a cold climate. Six homes with single pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homes had traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13% with the clear glass and 21% with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years for the low-e storm windows. (PDF)

US DOE: Affordable Window Retrofit Solutions With Storm Windows
US Department of Energy report Affordable Window Retrofit Solutions demonstrates a 10%-35% heating and cooling savings from the installation of low-e storm windows compared to single-pane and double-pane clear windows. The savings from installing low-e storm windows were roughly equivalent to the savings from window replacement with double-pane low-e windows; however, the storm window installation cost only about one quarter the cost of window replacement. (PDF)

US DOE: Energy Savings From Window Attachments
US Department of Energy online webinar slide show discusses how window attachments and coverings, such as storm windows and cellular shades, can be a cost-effective means of reducing energy use in residential buildings. (PDF)

US DOE: Evaluation Of Low-E Storm Windows In PNNL Lab Homes
US Department of Energy report Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes summarizes a whole-home experiment performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that suggests attaching low-e storm windows can result in as much energy savings as replacing the windows. (PDF)

US DOE: Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance Across US Climate Zones
US Department of Energy report Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones evaluated energy savings and cost effectiveness of installing low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows over existing windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climate zones. (PDF)
Procedures

Building America: Interior Removable Storm Windows
Building America Solution Center online guide describes considerations and procedures for installing interior removable storm windows.

Building America: Online Guide To Exterior Storm Windows
Building America Solution Center online guide describes considerations and procedures for installing exterior storm windows.

Building America: Online Guide To Interior Permanent Fixed Storm Windows
Building America Solution Center online guide describes considerations and procedures for installing interior permanent fixed storm windows.

Building Green: Insulated Storm Windows?
Building Green discusses whether top energy performance can be achieved by combining fairly standard windows with really good storm windows or even a second set of prime windows.

US DOE: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating
US Department of Energy says storm window installation is one of the most cost-effective solutions for upgrading energy inefficient existing windows. In fact, low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows can lower your utility bill just as much as replacing an entire window.
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